Billing Tweaks Don’t Make Net Metering Good Policy

Severin Borenstein published a blog on 2016 January 4 with the title of “Billing Tweaks Don’t Make Net Metering Good Policy.”  The entry reminded me of a presentation I had made in October at Oklahoma State, so I added the following comment to Severin’s Haas Blog.

Net Metering can be Good Policy for the recovery of some costs incurred by a utility in serving its customers, such as the cost billed to it by its ISO supplier.  But for the rest of the costs incurred by the utility, such as the cost of wires and meters, a demand charge and a monthly customer charge are more appropriate.

For the cost billed by the ISO supplier, the metering periods need to be aligned, an issue that is current before FERC in Settlement Intervals and Shortage Pricing in Markets Operated by Regional Transmission Organizations and Independent System Operators, FERC Docket No. RM15-24-000.  If the ISO is billing the utility based on fifteen minute intervals, it might be good policy for the utility to bill the retail consumer for those ISO costs on fifteen minute intervals using net metered amounts during those fifteen minute intervals.

This net metering paradigm seems to be only appropriate for the charges coming to the utility from the ISO, as I discussed in “Fairly Pricing Net Intervals While Keeping The Utility Financially Healthy,” 48th Annual Frontiers of Power Conference, cosponsored by The Engineering Energy Laboratory and The School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma, 2015 October 26-27.  A shorter version of this paper was published in Dialogue, United States Association for Energy Economics, 2015 September 1.  The full paper is on my web site  in the library under Conference Papers.

The majority of the cost incurred by an increasing number of utilities are incurred for wires.  A much better way to recover the cost of wires is a demand charge.  When the customer wants to have access to a specific amount of power, the customer can contract for wires access in that amount, which would be billed monthly based on contract demand.  Customers with poorer information about their power requirements can rely on a demand charge based on the interval with the highest net metered amount, generally fifteen minutes or an hour, though I have seen the interval being an entire summer month.  Customers who exceed their contract demand would pay for the excess demand through a multiple of the demand charge.

There are a few appropriate demand metrics, such as the customer maximum demand or more exotic demands such as the contribution to the distribution system peak or the peak on a subsection of the distribution system, all as discussed in the above paper.  We are still several years away from real time pricing of the distribution system, as I discussed in “Dynamic Pricing: Using Smart Meters to Solve Electric Vehicles Related Distribution Overloads,” Metering International, Issue 3, 2010.