Monthly Archives: March 2011

Electricity Crisis in Japan—California 2000/2001 deja vu

The electricity shortage in Japan as the result of the earthquake and tsunami could be reduced or eliminated by using backup generators. Data from California in 2000/2001 showed that California had sufficient backup generator capacity to meet over 80% of its load. But to prevent more rotating blackouts, Japan needs to be willing to pay the fuel costs of these backup generators so they will parallel to the central station power plants that normally produce all of the power. India has such a payment system in place for Unscheduled Interchange. Continue reading

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Socializing The Grid: The Reincarnation of Vampire Wheeling

Deja Vu–Twenty years ago El Paso built a transmission line and sought revenue from Plains which had an existing, parallel lower voltage transmission line. Plains called the concept Vampire Wheeling and resisted the blood sucking proposal. Now large transmission owners are seeking to socialize the cost of new high voltage lines, forcing smaller entities to pay those costs, a grander version of Vampire Wheeling. We need to de-socialize the process by paying for those lines on a real time basis that reflects the cost and reliability benefits being concurrently provided Continue reading

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